Question: What Happens If The Election Is Not Decided By Inauguration?

What does Article 2 Section 1 of the Constitution mean?

Section 1 of Article Two establishes the positions of the president and the vice president, and sets the term of both offices at four years.

This section gives the president the power to grant pardons.

Section 2 also requires the “principal officer” of any executive department to tender advice..

What does the US Constitution say about elections?

In Article I Section 4, the Constitution says: The times, places and manner of holding elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each state by the legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by law make or alter such regulations.

How are electoral votes per state?

Electoral votes are allocated among the States based on the Census. Every State is allocated a number of votes equal to the number of senators and representatives in its U.S. Congressional delegation—two votes for its senators in the U.S. Senate plus a number of votes equal to the number of its Congressional districts.

How many times a person can be elected as president?

Section 1. No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of the President more than once.

What does Article 4 Section 1 of the Constitution mean?

Article IV, Section 1 ensures that states respect and honor the state laws and court orders of other states, even when their own laws are different. … Article IV, Section 1 also gives Congress the power to determine how states recognize records and laws from other states and how they enforce each others’ court orders.

What happens if the electoral votes are not certified?

If they do not concur, the votes of the electors certified by the Governor of the State would be counted in Congress. Office and become the President of the United States and Vice President of the United States, respectively.

Can a state split electoral votes?

Under the District Method, a State’s electoral votes can be split among two or more candidates, just as a state’s congressional delegation can be split among multiple political parties. As of 2008, Nebraska and Maine are the only states using the District Method of distributing electoral votes.

What is the difference between president elect and president?

At the end of the term, the president-elect is promoted to the position of president, and a new president-elect is elected. … The position of president-elect is different from someone who was elected president and is called “president-elect” between the time of election and the start of the term.

What does Article 1 Section 6 of the Constitution mean?

Finally, and most importantly, Article I, Section 6 provides that “no person holding any office under the United States, shall be a member of either House during his continuance in office.” This provision is of profound structural importance since it prevents the appointment of powerful Senators or Congressmen to the …

Usually, electoral votes align with the popular vote in an election. … Each state shall appoint, in such manner as its legislature may direct, a number of electors equal to the whole number of senators and members of the House of Representatives to which the state may be entitled in the legislature.

How many signatures do you need to run for president?

1,000 signatures are required for a US House race and 10,000 for a statewide race (i.e. US President, US Senate, Governor, Lieutenant Governor, or Attorney General), including 400 from each Congressional district.

What happens if no one gets 270 electoral votes 2020?

A candidate must receive an absolute majority of electoral votes (currently 270) to win the presidency or the vice presidency. If no candidate receives a majority in the election for president or vice president, that election is determined via a contingency procedure established by the 12th Amendment.

How is a president chosen when none of the candidates?

If no candidate receives the majority of electoral votes, the vote goes to the House of Representatives. House members choose the new president from among the top three candidates. The Senate elects the vice president from the remaining top two candidates.

What happens if President elect dies?

The rules of both major parties stipulate that if the apparent winner dies under such circumstances and his or her running mate is still able to assume the presidency, then the running mate is to become the President-elect with the electors being directed to vote for the former Vice Presidential nominee for President.

Which states have the most electoral votes?

Currently, there are 538 electors, based on 435 representatives, 100 senators from the fifty states and three electors from Washington, D.C. The six states with the most electors are California (55), Texas (38), New York (29), Florida (29), Illinois (20), and Pennsylvania (20).