When Should I Use Were In A Sentence?

How do you use were in a sentence?

Use “were” as a past tense verb, as the: First-person plural of “be” (We “were” busy last week.) Second-person singular and plural of “be” (You “were” busy last week.) Third-person plural of “be” (They “were” busy last week.).

Where and were pronounced the same?

WHERE and WEAR are all pronounced the same. They are pronounced with two sounds: W-AIR. WERE Is pronounced with two sounds: W-ER. Watch this video lesson to learn these words.

What is a better word for was?

What is another word for was?appearedbecamelookedseemedcame to behad beenhas beenhave beenturned out to bewere2 more rows

Is there were correct grammar?

1 Answer. Answer #1 is correct; use the plural verb, were, because there are multiple toys. In my house, there were many toys. If you were talking about 1 pile of toys though, you would use “was,” the singular verb, because there is 1, single pile.

Were meaning and example?

Were is the past tense of be. An example of were is what a student would say if he was telling his mother that he and his friends had studied yesterday – We were studying yesterday. verb.

Were VS where VS wear?

Just remember that “we’re” is a contraction (the apostrophe is a giveaway), while “where” is a location, “were” is the past of “to be” (in some cases), and “wear” covers everything else (sometimes literally).

What is the difference between were and we re?

“Were” is simply a plural past-tense form of the verb “are.” To talk about something happening now or in the future, use “we’re”; but to talk about something in the past, use “were.” If you can’t substitute “we are” for the word you’ve written, omit the apostrophe.

Has been or have been?

“Has been” and “have been” are both in the present perfect tense. “Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. The present perfect tense refers to an action that began at some time in the past and is still in progress.

Which is correct grammatically correct if I was or if I were?

Many people use if I was and if I were interchangeably to describe a hypothetical situation. The confusion occurs because when writing in the past tense, I was is correct while I were is incorrect. However, when writing about non-realistic or hypothetical situations, if I were is the only correct choice.

Where or were in a sentence?

Were is the past tense of be when used as a verb. Where means in a specific place when used as an adverb or conjunction. A good way to remember the difference is that where has an “h” for “home”, and home is a place. Out of the two words, “were” is the most common.

Was or were used with you?

As I said above, was and were are in the past tense, but they are used differently. Was is used in the first person singular (I) and the third person singular (he, she, it). Were is used in the second person singular and plural (you, your, yours) and first and third person plural (we, they).

What is the word were?

Meaning – Were is the past tense of the verb are. … Since were means the same as the past tense of are in this sentence, it is the correct word to use. SUGGESTION: To test whether were is the correct word to use in a sentence, see if you can use are in its place, putting the sentence into the present tense.

Is were present tense?

Verb FormsFormVerbInfinitivebePast tensewas (for I / he / she / it); were (for we / you / they)Past participlebe, beenPresent participlebeing1 more row

What is the meaning of when?

When is a wh-word. We use when to ask questions, as a conjunction and to introduce relative clauses. … … We use when as a conjunction meaning ‘at the time that’.

What’s the difference between their and there?

There means the opposite of here; “at that place.” Their means “belongs to them.” They’re is a contraction of “they are” or “they were.”

What if there were or was?

Existential there has no special rules when it comes to the subjunctive. Just as “he was” becomes “he were” in the subjunctive, “there was” becomes “there were.” So the answer to Jessica’s question is that “were” is the correct choice.

Were a lot or was a lot?

I agree, it has to be “were” because “people” is plural. “A lot” can go either way, though; you can use “was” if the noun is collective, or otherwise singular. “There was a lot of emotion in his performance.”

Why do we say how are you instead of how is you?

In English, you originally was a second-person plural. For the singular you, there was a different word: thou (cf. German Du, Spanish tu, Russian ты). So you would ask “how are you”, but “how is thou” (more accurately, “how art thou”, but that is going too deep).